Home > Learning Facts & Figures > Your Pre-schooler's Learning Ability Revealed

Your Pre-schooler's Learning Ability Revealed

By: Rachel Newcombe - Updated: 8 Oct 2012 | comments*Discuss
 
Pre-school Pre-schoolers Learn Learning

How much do you really know about your pre-schooler’s learning ability? Below you’ll find a series of statements relating to the skills and abilities that pre-schoolers have. As you read through the statement, think about whether you think it’s true or false – then check below to discover the answer.

True or False?

Pre-schoolers Thrive on Learning to Play Games with Other People, Especially Their Peers.

Answer: True

Younger children are happy playing on their own, but by the time they reach about three years of age, they’ll be more happy to play games with other children. Their ability to share toys will have increased and they’ll be happy to listen to other ideas and suggestions of how to play and what to play with.

By the time a child reaches four to five years of age, they’ll be even more emphasis on playing games with peers. This is particularly so as this like to become part of a social group. It’s a good skill to have in place before they start at school and will make interacting and playing together that bit easier.

Pre-schoolers Should Always Stick to Reading Books Aimed at Their Exact Age.

Answer: False.

Whilst books for pre-schoolers often do come with a recommended reading age attached to them, there’s no logical reason why your child shouldn’t read books beyond or below their age too. It’s important to remember that all children are different and develop and learn at different paces. If your child has progressed well with their learning and is ready to move on and try books with more words, rather than be stuck with books with limited text and emphasising basic skills, then that’s absolutely fine.

If you stick with the simple books, then you run the risk of him either becoming completely bored or losing interest in entirely in having a go at reading. The last thing you want to do before they reach school age is but them off reading and being a slightly advanced reader will stand them in very good stead once they start at school.

A Pre-school Child Aged Four to Five Years Old Won’t be Able to Manage Using Scissors and They Could be Dangerous.

Answer: False

It’s true that the art of using scissors is something that is gained over time, but by the time a child is between four and five years old, their motor skills should have developed well and the should now have the ability to use scissors. Their cutting skills may be rather iffy and they might not yet have mastered cutting in straight lines, but practice makes perfect. Yes, scissors are dangerous, but using scissors is a handy skill to learn and they’ll enjoy having a go at cutting thing in arts and crafts activities. As long as you supervise your child, they should be safe.

Pre-schoolers Are too Young to Manage With Using Computers.

Answer: False

Pre-schoolers are keen to broaden their learning and love the chance to have a go on a computer. Whilst it’s not ideal for them to use computers for long lengths of time, for short periods it is fine. In fact, their future learning ability at school can be enhanced by gaining skills such as how to use a mouse, how to type on a keyboard, use basic controls and even send an email. Although these are skills you may have learnt a lot later in life, children are able to master these skills at a surprisingly young age. The trouble is, you may subsequently have competition for who’s going to use the computer!

You might also like...
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice..
Why not be the first to leave a comment for discussion, ask for advice or share your story...

If you'd like to ask a question one of our experts (workload permitting) or a helpful reader hopefully can help you... We also love comments and interesting stories

Title:
(never shown)
Firstname:
(never shown)
Surname:
(never shown)
Email:
(never shown)
Nickname:
(shown)
Comment:
Validate:
Enter word:
Topics
Further Reading...
Our Most Popular...
Add to my Yahoo!
Add to Google
Stumble this
Add to Twitter
Add To Facebook
RSS feed
You should seek independent professional advice before acting upon any information on the EarlyChildhoodEducation website. Please read our Disclaimer.